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Classic literature: blessing or curse?

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Classic literature: blessing or curse?

Enthusiastic Eston Williams and annoyed Matt LaRocco reading

Enthusiastic Eston Williams and annoyed Matt LaRocco reading "The Bell Jar."

Lauren Tittes

Enthusiastic Eston Williams and annoyed Matt LaRocco reading "The Bell Jar."

Lauren Tittes

Lauren Tittes

Enthusiastic Eston Williams and annoyed Matt LaRocco reading "The Bell Jar."

Lauren Tittes, Reporter

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Reading books in English class can either go one of two ways: either you’ll love the book that you’re assigned or you’ll completely and utterly hate it. So should schools update their assigned reading? Or is it good for kids to be well-rounded in classic literature?

 

I’m sure every student could name a book or two that they just could not stand, and it tends to be books that we consider to be “old” or boring.” Since middle school, we’ve been reading seemingly only classic novels, books written literally decades ago. The same goes for every other junior high and high school in America; we’ve all been reading the same books for years. Is it time for a change?

 

Personally, I don’t mind the “outdated” books; they’re called “classic” for a reason. From To Kill A Mockingbird to The Catcher in the Rye, these books have continued to have an influence on English programs around the United States, and I think it’s for good reason. Yes, many of the themes don’t necessarily apply to today’s time, but I think that that’s what makes them special. It gives kids the opportunity to get a glimpse of what the past was like, which I think is very important, especially in intellectual growth.

 

Maybe a few newer, more modern books could be added into the curriculums, to “space out” the older literature for those students who prefer books from this time period, by authors who are actually alive. But I think it’s really cool that we live in a time where we can look back at all these talented authors and their works and truly get an insight into their times. Being able to even read a book is such a gift, and these books will continue to live on through the years until our kids will probably be reading the same things.

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Lauren Tittes, Reporter

Hello, my name is Lauren Tittes. I am currently a senior at Orcutt Academy. My interests include hanging out with my friends, family, and my dog Sam. I...

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