The sad struggle of the modern farmer

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The sad struggle of the modern farmer

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Ever since the industrialization of agriculture, farmers have been forced by investors to keep up on the latest and greatest technology. This issue is more complicated today since banks have gotten involved with this process. Within the world of agriculture lay a mirroring operation of loan giving and loan taking based heavily on technology and innovation. This relationship threatens any expansionary plans wanted to be taken by farmers, locking them into an endless cycle of debt and false promises.

The agricultural world works in a type of closed financial loop. Banks will only give loans to farmers who show they are willing to use the latest advances in the agricultural world to ascertain the highest crop yields. The problem with this, of course, is that the latest advances in agriculture are not always the most ethical.

The past couple of decades have shown an overwhelming promotion of Genetically Modified Organisms, or GMO’s, in the production of our crops along with the use of pesticides and herbicides. Farmers across the nation often are forced to use such processes to look competitive alongside their neighboring farms. This process has trapped farmers into using whatever product big agricultural recommends.

Many have attempted to find ways to release this pressure from farmers in finding new ways to keep them competitive. One of the leading foundations in finding this solution is the group of thinkers over at Farmer’s Footprint. This association is actively traveling between farms of the midwest, preaching the benefits of organic farming not only as a healthier way of production, but also as being financially less cumbersome. This foundation hopes to cut out the middleman, being the banker, and allowing consumers to directly financially support the farmers growing their produce.

However revolutionary, it’s ideas like these that move us in the right direction. The health and financial wellbeing of our farmers should be just as important as the quality of our food, and it isn’t until we start caring for every process in the production of our food that we will reach a state of produce and production that is both healthy and sustainable.

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